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Physics
Master of Science (MS)
University of Vermont in Burlington, VT
The M.S. degree requires thirty credit hours of course work course work and thesis research for graduation. At least six of these, but no more than 15, must be Master's thesis research credits. At least nine credit hours must be taken from 300-level courses, the remaining courses can be taken at the 200-level. At least 21 credit hours must be taken at UVM in order to satisfy residency requirements. At the start of their second semester at UVM, students are expected to sit for the written part of the Comprehensive Exam which covers classical mechanics, quantum mechanics, electricity and magnetism, statistical thermal physics, modern physics, and experimental physics. Students are given two opportunities to pass the comprehensive exam. In addition to the written portion, there is also an oral portion that consists of a Master's thesis proposal given after the start of a thesis research project. The Department of Physics offers research opportunities in theoretical and experimental condensed matter physics, astronomy and astrophysics, and soft condensed matter physics and biophysics. Research in theoretical condensed matter physics focuses on the dynamics of quantum systems with application to electronic, magnetic, optical, structural, and thermal properties of nanomaterials including fullerene-derived solids (buckyballs) and carbon nanotubes. Basic research also includes the investigation of low energy scattering of atoms and molecules from surfaces and systems with many internal degrees of freedom, and the development of new methods for studying quantum many-body systems, such as new extensions of density functional theory to van der Waals systems. In addition, high performance computational techniques including quantum Monte Carlo and exact diagonalization are used to study strongly-interacting quantum systems with a focus on the types of emergent phenomena that are ubiquitous in complex systems. This includes investigations of entanglement in quantum fluids and gases in the presence of confinement, disorder, and dissipation. The physics of recently discovered Graphene and its derivatives is another major direction of theoretical research. These materials exhibit unconventional electronic, magnetic, mechanical, and transport properties, and efforts are under way to understand the role of quantum many-body effects both from fundamental standpoint and in relation to nanodevice applications. Additional theoretical studies include strongly-correlated electron systems, such as complex oxides and cuprates and high-temperature superconductors. Of particular interest are frustrated quantum magnets with novel ground states, as well as conducting cuprates which exhibit complex interplay of charge and spin phenomena. Such systems also tend to undergo quantum phase transitions, and the study of quantum critical phenomena is a major research direction. Theoretical studies of the optical properties of materials include the electronic structure of defect complexes in ionic crystals, the application of subtracted dispersion relations to optical data analysis, and the separation of inter- and intra-band effects in the infrared spectra of metals. Related studies are concerned with theories of X-ray scattering, of X-ray optical properties, and of X-ray optical elements. Research in materials physics includes studies of the kinetics of thin film growth and surface processing, applied to materials with interesting and useful physical properties such as organic semiconductors and magnetic materials. Many of the research projects involve real-time X-ray or electron diffraction structural studies of surface phenomena, combined with computer simulation of relevant surface processes. Available is an ultra-high vacuum thin-film deposition laboratory dedicated to these studies, and regular use is made of synchrotron X-ray facilities in the U.S. Additional research in materials physics includes studies of fundamental magnetic and spin-dependent electronic properties of semiconductor nanostructures that employ high magnetic field optical spectroscopy imaging techniques. The physics department hosts one of the few laboratories in New England where time-resolved, spin-dependent spectroscopy imaging at magnetic fields as high as five Tesla may be carried out. Astrophysical research centers on experimental radio astronomy, with particular emphasis on pulsars and the interstellar medium. Observations are carried out using major instruments of the U.S. National Observatories and generally involve computer analysis and interpretation. Research in biophysical ultrasound is directed toward an understanding of the physical principles involved when ultrasound interacts with living systems. This often involves collaboration with the College of Medicine. Acoustical and optical tweezers permit manipulating single cells without touching them. New forms of ultrasonic transducers and biosensors are being developed in collaboration with the Department of Electrical Engineering, as part of the Materials Science program. Biophysical research includes studies on the development and employment of novel uses of in situ atomic force microscopy for biological applications, specifically high-resolution structural studies of membrane proteins, investigation of the packing of genetic materials on bilayer membranes, and studies on how DNA-bilayer interactions affect the use of cationic lipids as gene-delivery means. Other research in biological physics and protein dynamics involves combining the detail of atomic-resolution X-ray crystallography with the sensitivity of optical and IR spectroscopy. The department has access to a state-of-the-art protein crystallography diffractometer and organizes regular trips to synchrotrons in the U.S. and Europe. Opportunities for collaborative research with other university departments and groups include those with Chemistry, the Materials Science program, Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, the Cellular, Molecular and Biomedical Sciences program, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Medical Radiology, and Geology.
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Sticker Price
$ 31,672
Avg. Price
$ 15,687
University of Vermont
Sticker Price
$ 31,672
Avg. Price
$ 15,687
Learn more about degree programs at University of Vermont
University of Vermont
Chemistry
Master of Science (MS)
University of Vermont in Burlington, VT
The chemistry department offers a M.S. graduate program in analytical, inorganic, organic or physical chemistry. An M.S. degree in chemistry prepares students for careers in chemical sciences, biomedical sciences, catalysis, energy, environment, or materials science as well as other professional fields that apply strong research skills or basic chemical understanding. The educational philosophy of the department allows for considerable flexibility in a student's graduate program. You may take courses in fields outside the department, such as biochemistry, pharmacology, physics, mathematics, environmental science, and other science areas in a program tailored to your interests and needs. In the chemistry department, courses are offered in inorganic chemistry, organometallic chemistry, physical inorganic chemistry, synthetic organic chemistry, physical organic chemistry, heterocyclic chemistry, advanced analytical chemistry, optical spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, quantum chemistry and polymer chemistry.
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Sticker Price
$ 31,672
Avg. Price
$ 15,687
University of Vermont
Sticker Price
$ 31,672
Avg. Price
$ 15,687
Learn more about degree programs at University of Vermont
University of Vermont
Searches related to become an optical assistant
biomed: molecular biology, cell biology, and biochemistry: mcb students are required to successfully complete a minimum of five courses worth six credits for the doctoral degree. typically, mcb students will complete the course work outlined below during their first three semesters. curricular tracksthe course work is anchored by two core classes; a literature-based class on multidisciplinary experimental approaches to biological questions (biol2030 "foundations for advanced study in experimental biology," two credits) in the first semester, and a class on scientific communication skills (biol2150 "scientific communication," one credit) in the third semester. upon matriculation, students may choose among three curricular tracks. the mcb track provides advanced training in cell, developmental, and molecular biology, and biochemistry; the fcg track provides advanced training in computational and systems biology, and the mboa track provides training in the molecular mechanisms of aging. each of the tracks incorporates quantitative methodologies into the analysis of biological systems but emphasizes different approaches. training in molecular biology, cell biology and biochemistry (mcb) students interested in pursuing advanced study in the life sciences may choose the mcb curricular track as their course of study once admitted to the mcb graduate program. the mcb curriculum is aimed at students with a primary interest in molecular biology, cell biology, developmental biology, proteomics and/or biochemistry. mcb students will gain instruction in quantitative approaches to biological processes including statistics and bioinformatics through "quantitative approaches in biology" (biol2010, one credit) during the second semester. the goals of this course are to strengthen necessary mathematical skills and to gain understanding of quantitative approaches required to address complex problems in modern biology. mcb students can tailor their course work to the disciplines specifically related to their interests through a combination of didactic courses and topical seminars offered in each of the disciplines. in addition to biol2010, biol2030, and biol2150, students are expected to complete a minimum of two 2000-level electives, with at least one 2000-level seminar format course, in fulfillment of the requirements for their doctoral degree. the seminar courses are designed to offer students in-depth training in specific topics in molecular biology, cell biology, developmental biology, proteomics and biochemistry. training in functional and computational genetics (fcg) students with a strong interest in advanced training in both biology and computational approaches may choose fcg curricular track as their course of study once admitted to the mcb graduate program. the fcg curriculum is aimed at students with a primary background in biology, but also with appropriate mathematical preparation (college-level calculus) and interest in applying advanced quantitative methodologies towards the understanding of gene function and regulation in development and disease. in the second semester, students will supplement their genetic training from biol2030 with additional advanced coursework in genetics. possibilities include "molecular genetics " (biol2540) or topical seminar offerings in genetics and/or genomics. the remainder of the formal fcg curriculum is dedicated to developing advanced skills in quantitative approaches to biological problems. based on their interests, fcg students may choose to tailor their mathematical training along either of two paths: genomics - students can select between an applied mathematics track or a computer science track. for the applied mathematics track, in the first semester training in statistical analysis of complex datasets will begin with "statistical inference" (apma 1650) and will continue in the second semester with "inference in genomics and molecular biology" (apma 1080). for the computer science track, training in computer programming will be achieved through "introduction to object-oriented programming and computer science" (csci 0150) in the first semester and "introduction to algorithms and data structures" (csci0160) in the second semester, or through "computer science: an integrated introduction" (csci 0170 fall/csci 0180 spring). the training will continue in the third semester with "computational molecular biology" (csci 1810). systems biology - in the first semester, training in the mathematical modeling of biological systems will begin with "methods of applied mathematics i" (apma 0330 or apma 0350). the choice between the apma courses is based on the student’s interests. apma 0330 emphasizes the application of established methods, while apma 0350 focuses on the development of methodological foundations. in the second semester, training will continue with "methods of applied mathematics ii" (apma 0340 or apma 0360). students interested in systems biology will conclude their formal course work requirement in mathematics with "quantitative models of biological systems" (apma 1070) in the third semester. training in the molecular biology of aging